Our Philosophy

FuelChoiceNow believes that U.S. transportation fuel markets should be competitive and consumers should have a choice at the pump.

FuelChoiceNow believes that policymakers should take every reasonable step to open U.S. transportation fuel markets to alternative fuels.

Our rationale:

check! The economic consequences of oil dependence are severe.

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Virtually every facet of our economy is tied to oil prices. When oil prices spike, the costs of living and doing business follow.

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The Chief Economist of the International Energy Agency (IEA) recently stated, “[i]n terms of oil markets, I believe the age of cheap oil is over.

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Oil price shocks and price manipulation by OPEC cost the U.S. economy roughly $1.9 trillion from 2004 to 2008, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

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75 cents of every dollar spent on petroleum is exported out of the country, at the rate of almost $1 billion per day (source: ILSR, U.S. DOE).

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Over the course of history, a recession has followed every major oil shock, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

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Our economy will become more strained as the worldwide demand for oil increases and global oil reserves become more depleted and expensive.

check! The environmental consequences of oil dependence are severe.

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“The era of easy oil is over,” according to Chevron and other oil companies.

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The more difficult to reach oil resources are dirtier (e.g. tar sands, thermally-enhanced oil recovery, heavy oil) and come with serious ecological risk (e.g. deep water spills such as the BP Gulf Spill).

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To avoid the “marginal” barrel of oil, we need to use less fuel and more liquid fuel alternatives, as opposed to either/or.

check! There are affordable ways to significantly increase market access for alternative fuels in the immediate term.

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Flex Fuel Vehicles (FFVs) run on virtually any blend of ethanol, methanol and gasoline, and are extremely cheap to manufacture (~ $35 additional cost).

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In Brazil, about 90 percent of all new vehicles sold are flex-fuel, including those manufactured by well-known U.S. automakers.

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There are “off the shelf” (i.e. widely and commercially available) technologies allowing flexible blending of bio-based and petroleum diesel fuels.

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Aggressive deployment of FFVs would immediately open U.S. fuel markets to flexible and competitive blending of gasoline and diesel with ethanol, methanol and bio-based diesel fuels.

check! The costs of FFV deployment are very low and the Return on Investment (ROI) is extremely high.

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FFV technology is very cheap and already commercialized.

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Aggressive FFV deployment comes at no cost to the U.S. Treasury.

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Open fuel markets are critical to unfettering the natural market forces that will lead to major infrastructural developments (e.g. blender pumps).

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FFVs introduce new fuels into the marketplace in the immediate term, extending supply and moderating pump prices. For example, during the 2008 oil price spike, ethanol reduced fuel prices by 15 percent (Merrill Lynch).

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Open fuel markets are critical to catalyzing ongoing investment in advanced biofuels and meeting the requirements of the Renewable Fuel Standard.

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Recent reports suggest that there are hundreds of thousands of direct and indirect jobs at stake with the development of advanced biofuels alone. FFVs are critical to fueling the demand necessary to unleash those jobs.

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Open fuel markets are critical to attracting venture capital to low carbon and ultra low carbon alternative fuels.

check! Other types of alternative fuels and vehicles are beginning to emerge.

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Consumers are willing to pay more for vehicles (and premium vehicle options) that are desirable to them.

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While electric vehicles are still more expensive than internal combustion vehicles over the life of the vehicle (~ $4-5,000 per vehicle), the delta is shrinking due to the increase in petroleum price and the decrease in battery costs. The cost per mile of travel is still a small fraction of that for internal conbustion engines.

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As is the case with electric vehicles, vehicles that run on compressed natural gas (CNG) are several thousand dollars more expensive to purchase, but offer significantly lower refueling costs over the life of the vehicle based on the fact that natural gas is cheaper than gasoline and diesel fuel. If CNG cars became more ubiquitous, they could be offered at far less retail cost.

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Cost parity should not be considered a prerequisite to consumer choice, as cost is only one variable in the purchasing decision and the vehicles, vehicle options and fuels offered today come with wide ranging incremental costs.






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